Reaching for the Moon (As Far as the Eye Can See)

Reaching for the Moon (as far as the eye can see) vintage curtains, thread, metal,

mineral pigments, makeup, paint, rock, light, 280 x 160 x 110cm

Gazing through a domestic lens our understanding of the world beyond is both revealed and concealed through ebbs and flows of knowledge. Reaching for the Moon reflects upon the complexities of our interrelationships with spaces and how cultural and social perspectives transform our experience of place.  

Vintage curtains and their metaphorical associations with the discarded, the everyday, the body and gender are utilised to investigate the phenomena of viewpoint. Constructive and destructive making traditions examine tensions between the visible and the felt, interior and exterior space, social realities and romantic ideals that influence our perception and knowledge of our worlds.  
The moon is often cast as a cultural mirror upon which we project notions of hope, aspirational dreams, escape, utopia, spirituality, quests for discovery or a desire for universal conquest. It’s a talisman that connects us all but we also experience it differently, depending on our cultural and social veiwpoint. Gazing upwards at the sky our concept of the moon never wanders too far from the worlds we know best.
 
 

What Remains: SALTWATER exhibition Manly Art Gallery

Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm

What Remains features in SALTWATER, an exhibition currently on at Manly Art Gallery. The ceramic sculpture and salt installation responds to the ocean as a dystopic landscape. It explores the sea as a place where contemporary human dramas are played out as people seek sanctuary and safe harbour, and as a site of irreversible ecological and geographical loss in a climate changed future. The work is a fragile memorial relic that references our complex cultural, psychological and corporeal connections to the ocean through motifs of human and marine anatomy as well as maritime architecture. Despite human loss and environmental destruction ‘what remains’ is the chance to seek new responses and political solutions to human struggles.


SALTWATER celebrates the vibrant arts community of Sydney’s Northern Beaches at Manly Art Gallery and showcases new art works by 45 Northern Beaches artists.
The exhibiting artists have taken inspiration from a single theme – Saltwater. “The concept of ‘Saltwater’ has been a recurring area of interest for Manly Art Gallery & Museum throughout 2015 and was chosen to reflect the multiple possibilities and perspectives of saltwater as an idea, a metaphor, a possibility, a physical place and as a cultural presence,” said Senior Curator Katherine Roberts. Saltwater includes photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, glass and ceramics.
Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm
Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm