Gathering Shadows

 

Suzanne Davey, Gathering Shadows, ceramic, brick, bones, wood, charcoal, metal,charcoal, shells, 70 x 300 x 300 cm

 

Gathering Shadows is a site responsive installation that responds to the changing cultural history of the Coal Loader, Waverton, from its indigenous heritage, land use on the site, its role in facilitating the coal mining industry through to its current role as a centre for sustainability on the harbour foreshore. 
 
The work considers our inter-dependence with site histories (indigenous, animal, geological) and the potential future consequences of our collective actions and inaction towards environmental ecologies. 
 
Notions of temporal flows, site ruptures and dis-ruptures, surface wounds and healing are investigated. 
 
The work explores clay as a media shaped by human touch and the ceramic traditions of containment. Unable to hold back their contents shells, small animal bones, charcoal and bricks flow and spill in the shadows of the ceramic forms. 
Installation detail Gathering Shadows, ceramic, bricks, small animal bones, wood, charcoal, shells, metal,
70cm  x 300cm x 300cm
Ceramic form detail, Gathering Shadows, ceramic, bricks, small animal bones. wood, charcoal, shells, metal, 65cm  x 45cm x 45cm

 

Collecting Mountains

Suzanne Davey, Collecting Mountains, sound, ceramics, photography
 and mixed media. 220cm x 200cm x 150cm

 

Collecting Mountainsis multidisciplinary installation created for EARTH: Four Elements exhibition at Warringah Creative Space. The project includes sound, photography, ceramics, plants, books relating to mountains, topographical maps of mountainous areas, domestic furniture, bricks and volcanic rocks. The sound element was a soothing Mountain Meditation repeated continuously. It was created by Wendy Wood, University of Derby, as part of a nursing workshop on compassion focussed therapy.
 
Collecting Mountainsreflects upon our complex and contradictory interrelationship with geology and our passive observations of the altered ecologies of the earths surface as we go about our day to day lives.
 
The work investigates mountains as a cultural construct upon which we project our desires for conquest, escape from the everyday, for spiritual fulfillment, our thirst for exploration and aspirational dreams. They fulfil key physical and psychological human needs yetwe transform them irrevocably via land acquisition, large scale landscaping, mining and architectural interventions.
 
The installation explores clay as an earth resource transformed by human action and draws upon ceramic decorative traditions of display in a domestic context, as passive background to our everyday experiences.
 
Collecting Mountains asks how we might re-imagine our future relationshipwith the earths surface and considers how we may evolve into a sustaining speciesthrough reflection and thoughtful action.
 
Ceramic detail, Suzanne Davey, Upside Down Mountain Pot, stoneware,
metal stand, plant 180
cm x 55cm x 55cm
 
 
Installation detail, Suzanne Davey, Book Mountain, stoneware,
books (mountain books not depicted), 50cm x 60cm x 35cm
 

 

Ceramic detail, Suzanne Davey, Slices of Mountains,
stoneware, 
220cm x 200cm x 150cm
Installation detail, Suzanne Davey, ceramic from Shadowlands series,
stoneware, 25cm x20cm x 20cm

What Remains: SALTWATER exhibition Manly Art Gallery

Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm

What Remains features in SALTWATER, an exhibition currently on at Manly Art Gallery. The ceramic sculpture and salt installation responds to the ocean as a dystopic landscape. It explores the sea as a place where contemporary human dramas are played out as people seek sanctuary and safe harbour, and as a site of irreversible ecological and geographical loss in a climate changed future. The work is a fragile memorial relic that references our complex cultural, psychological and corporeal connections to the ocean through motifs of human and marine anatomy as well as maritime architecture. Despite human loss and environmental destruction ‘what remains’ is the chance to seek new responses and political solutions to human struggles.


SALTWATER celebrates the vibrant arts community of Sydney’s Northern Beaches at Manly Art Gallery and showcases new art works by 45 Northern Beaches artists.
The exhibiting artists have taken inspiration from a single theme – Saltwater. “The concept of ‘Saltwater’ has been a recurring area of interest for Manly Art Gallery & Museum throughout 2015 and was chosen to reflect the multiple possibilities and perspectives of saltwater as an idea, a metaphor, a possibility, a physical place and as a cultural presence,” said Senior Curator Katherine Roberts. Saltwater includes photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, glass and ceramics.
Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm
Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm

Sweet Surrender


Suzanne Davey, Sweet Surrender, ceramic, metal, 220 cm x 220cm x 30cm



A protective response to the fragility of the delicate ecosystem of Stony Range; captured, completely surrounded and held to ransom by the encroaching urban environment.

 A site specific work installed in Stony Range Regional Botanical Garden 2014.



Overhead installation view, Sweet Surrender, ceramic, metal, 220 cm x 220cm x 30cm

Installation detail, Sweet Surrender, ceramic, metal, 220 cm x 220cm x 30cm

Ceramic detail, Sweet Surrender, ceramic, metal

Installation view, Sweet Surrender, ceramic, metal, 220 cm x 220cm x 30cm